Think about the last time you visited the FAQ section on a website. Why must the map on how to navigate the site be sequestered away from the site itself? Users are often forced to leave whichever page they are looking at in order to track down information somewhere else on your website. And this puts all the burden on your customers, rather than on your website where it should be. Not only must customers leave the page they are looking at to find the information they want. They are often met with pages of gray print that take time to sift through. AnswerDash has provided an answer to this predicament. The company has eliminated the use of ‘help islands’; or separate, standalone pages that are often slapped onto sites with little to no integration into the flow of the information . Rather than being redirected to a separate page, users are able to access a tab on the page itself and search from there. This is the exact opposite of the standard help island formula. As AnswerDash representative Morgan Moretz said in an email interview with Small Business Trends, “AnswerDash is the next generation of website self-service that gives users the right answers, at the right place, at the right time. “With AnswerDash, digging through knowledge base articles is avoided. Lengthy typing sessions back-and-forth in a live chat window, whether with a bot or a human, are avoided. Phone calls are avoided. Although this type of ‘in-context’ help has been a concept known to computer scientists for decades, AnswerDash is the first company ever to provide it as a SaaS-based answer layer that can grow over time as Web visitors ask new questions.” AnswerDash also makes use of analytics, providing the site with data about which questions are asked most often. This data, in turn, provides insights into what is causing potential customers to unsubscribe, abandon carts, or just leave, so that the issues can be addressed and fixed. “Our data shows that 5 to 15 percent of customers on a website will use AnswerDash to get answers to their questions,” Moretz mentions, “That’s 50 to 150 times as much usage as most online businesses that rely on help islands to provide answers.” According to AnswerDash’s own case study  (PDF), its tool helps to reduce customer support volumes by up to 50 percent, which means customers are spending more time looking at your product, not an FAQ. Not only do they spend less time searching for answers, but they also spend less time contacting support phone lines, live chat options, or email. (These solutions can be costly or inconvenient for both parties anyway.) By simply accessing a small tab at the top of the page, users are able to access a list of questions and issues giving them information as quickly as possible. Creating a streamlined system is critical to retaining customers on your site. When users encounter problems, they often become frustrated, and negative experiences do not bring about repeat customers. Instead, AnswerDash tried to design its system to minimize reliance on huge Q&A sections or frustrating  customer support. Moretz says, “In recognition of most people’s desire to solve their own problems rather than contacting customer support, AnswerDash makes getting self-service answers easy — much easier than FAQs or other help islands. In fact, most customers never need to type a single word when getting answers with AnswerDash since it’s based on the power of point-and-click. Image: AnswerDash This article, ” AnswerDash: Provide Predictive Answers Before Your Customers Even Ask Them ” was first published on Small Business Trends

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Influencer marketing is becoming an increasingly popular trend in the business world. While it’s unlikely that most small businesses can afford to hire big name social influencers to promote their brands on social media or video platforms, creating a brand as a social influencer has become a business in and of itself. These social influencers serve as sort of a modern marketing agency and media outlet in one. They create valuable content while also promoting brands within their niche. In fact, several new businesses have popped up in recent years with the sole purpose of connecting these influencers with the brands in their niche. FameBit is one example. But there’s also Grapevine and Content BLVD  for YouTube influencers,  Revfluence for social media and more. Brands can use these platforms to more easily find relevant influencers to work with. And influencers can use them to monetize their content. Some have even made a career out of it. Agnes Kozera, co-founder and COO of FameBit told Small Business Trends in an email, “Some influencers use FameBit as a ‘side hustle’ to make some extra cash to fund their creations, but some of them are actually able to quit their day jobs and make a living entirely from partnering with brands on social media. It’s all about how active you are in sending proposals to brands.” But it’s not something that just anyone can use to get rich quick. In order to use FameBit, influencers must have more than 5,000 followers on YouTube, Instagram, Twitter, Vine, Facebook or Tumblr. So you have to spend some time building up a following and creating valuable, consistent content before you’re able to make a career as an influencer, at least through FameBit. Justin Tse, or JTechApple as he’s known to his fans on YouTube and other social platforms, is one of the influencers who uses FameBit to connect with brands. Tse says that he spent a lot of time building up his online following before ever connecting with brands through FameBit, and that posting consistently has been key to his success. Tse says that he was unsure about sponsored content at first. But now he estimates that he shared about 50 brand collaborations in some form or another in 2015. He said in an email interview with Small Business Trends, “I really didn’t start participating in formal sponsored brand collaborations until 2015. Before then, I was rather hesitant to reach out to companies directly for promotional purposes because I was unsure if my reputation was relevant enough to garner interest. However, upon my discovery of FameBit, I found it does a great job of bridging relationships with brands that have products relating directly to my channel and are actively looking to work with content creators like myself.” But of course, posting sponsored or brand related content is not without its drawbacks. Technology vlogger and content creator David Di Franco is another influencer who’s used FameBit to connect with brands. He told Small Business Trends, “Bringing any kind of sponsorship into the mix always causes a few people to become upset. However, I don’t let that bother me, especially considering the positive outweighs the negative. Also, I think it’s becoming more obvious to viewers that content creators need to make a living, too. With advertising revenue all over the place nowadays, it certainly doesn’t hurt to explore relevant branding opportunities.” There are some things that influencers can do to make sure that their sponsored content doesn’t alienate too many of their followers. It can actually be a benefit to both the influencer and the brand to make sure that the sponsorship side fits in seamlessly with the influencer’s normal style and topic area. Since many people are unlikely to continue watching or following an influencer that just puts out straight advertisements for irrelevant brands, it’s up to the influencers to work brands into their content in a way that makes sense. That means both finding brands that are relevant to their existing content, and sharing sponsored content in a way that feels natural. Beauty, fashion and lifestyle vlogger Shawnda Patterson, also known as BronzeGoddess01 , told Small Business Trends, “My audience reacts well to sponsored content because it is organic. For example, I love bath goodies and my subscribers know that. I’ve probably mentioned that a thousand times on my channel. If my viewers see me doing a review for bath bombs, body washes or a bath sponge, they know that I was genuinely interested in the products. As long as the sponsored content is true to what the vlogger is about, it is better received and, in most cases, welcomed.” However, Patterson also says that it’s important to be transparent about sponsored content. She always states clearly when she’s been given an item to review or compensated for sharing content related to a certain brand. Of course, the way that influencers share content and connect with brands is an evolving concept. But it certainly seems to be catching on in a big way. Currently, FameBit has about 30,000 creators on its platform with a combined reach of 1.5 billion followers. In addition, branded video content where creators find brand opportunities on FameBit has been viewed 350 million times, with a total of 1 billion minutes viewed, according to Kozera. And while it may seem like this marketing concept is out of reach for small businesses, Kozera says that there are options out there. She says, “Influence marketing doesn’t need to be expensive in order to work. In other words, small businesses don’t need to work with the biggest stars to see results. They can see success by enlisting the trust of smaller but equally passionate influencers that fit their brand culture and image and who have loyal tight-knit communities. Ultimately, working with many smaller influencers can have a better and greater impact than working with one big star.” Image: FameBit This article, ” Content Creators Earn, Learn from Marketing Their Influence ” was first published on Small Business Trends

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America has always been considered the land of opportunity. With the advent of the Internet and eBay, the whole world is getting in on the act. For Cori and Beau O’Steen, eBay was the stairway to the world of commerce with their business, UpakNShip , a shipping materials supply store. UpakNShip was founded in January 2003, when Cori O’Steen — fresh from a divorce — looked around for something she could do from home. Working from home was important to the newly single mother of two. At first, she sold clothing on eBay and gradually moved into packing supplies. Starting with doing it all from her home, the business has expanded into two warehouses, one in South Carolina and one in California. UpakNShip sends out about 5,000 shipments per month and has averaged 50 percent growth per year for the last few years. Beau O’Steen joined this small team when he married Cori and, after leaving the U.S. Marines in 2007, became part of the business. The division of work allows Cori to stay home in spite of the massive growth in the business and take care of orders and supplies via Internet. Beau takes care of matters at the warehouses. Beau laughingly says on a video made by eBay below, “If you want to sell on eBay, have a super-smart wife in charge.” The O’Steens, grateful for the prosperity of their business, wanted to share it. Since Beau had served tours in Iraq and Kuwait, returning servicemen and their struggle with mainstreaming into civilian life spoke to them. Their choice of charity …  Operation Family Fund (OFF), a non-profit in California that provides assistance to returning veterans. OFF’s mission statement says: “To assist the injured and families of the those who have been injured as a part of the Global War on Terrorism, whether domestic or abroad, military or civilian, with financial grants for transitioning to their new circumstances and achieving financial self-sufficiency.” The O’Steens have made giving an ongoing process by giving all the proceeds from their bidding auctions on eBay to Operation Family Fund. The rest of the business, direct sales through eBay and their website, supports the business. Giving to help others makes success in business meaningful. Cori says in an interview with Web.com : “Being an entrepreneur is not about what you are selling, so do not get overly fixated on the product. It is about being a business owner, and there is nothing else I would rather do to earn a living.” Image: ebay This article, ” Family Business Donates 100 Percent of its Auctions to Operation Family Fund ” was first published on Small Business Trends

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There are certainly business applications for drones. But there is a darker side to the unmanned flying devices as well. Commercially available drones have the potential to be used to invade people’s privacy in a hostile or menacing way. Just the thought of drones in the wrong hands is terrifying. However, the use of hostile unmanned aerial vehicles presents a unique opportunity for savvy entrepreneurs to develop a business offering ways to combat drones. Only recently, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) announced that over 300,000 drones were registered  within the first month of instituting new regulations. That tells you drones are in sizable demand and are becoming affordable and more broadly available to the public. Starting a business to combat drones that are considered to be hostile looks more and more like an increasingly viable business opportunity. Below are some business ideas to combat drones that you can use to become a drone entrepreneur. Business Ideas to Combat Drones 1. Use Birds of Prey to Intercept Hostile Drones The Dutch National Police  reported  recently they are exploring the possibilities of using birds of prey as interceptors of hostile drones. The project is an initiative of the Dutch police in collaboration with Guard From Above and the Dutch Organization for Applied Scientific Research (TNO). Guard From Above is a pioneering company specializing in training birds of prey to intercept hostile drones, while TNO is involved in exploring the impact of the drones on the claws of the birds. This initiative may suggest how you can carve out your own niche in the promising anti-drone industry, and provide innovative security solutions. 2. Offer Drone Detection and Radio Jamming Services Passive countermeasures for combating hostile drones include the use of traditional radio jammers. Here, radar technologies and newer drone detection services like DroneShield are used to detect and jam the navigation system of hostile drones. DroneShield, for example, “contains a database of common acoustic signatures unique to drones” that alerts nearby security of the presence of a hostile drone. You can provide a similar service offering to jam hostile drones, triangulate the identity and location of the pilot and direct law enforcement officers straight to them. 3. Manufacture, Sell, or Repair Anti-Drone Counter Measures Active countermeasures for combating hostile drones include shooting them down. To shoot a drone down, you will need a proper weapon. We’re not condoning or even suggesting grabbing a shotgun and aiming high in the air to take down drones, of course. Instead, some drones are being taken out of the sky using radio waves that specifically target drones. You can start a similar business that provides affordable alternatives to bridge the gap between regular shotguns and truck-mounted anti-drone systems. 4. Start a Hostile Drone Netting Service Another active defense counter-measure against hostile drones involves a predator anti-drone drone. (Say that three times fast!) The anti-drone vehicle fires a large net to reel in suspicious unmanned aircrafts and carry them away to safety. This approach has been used by the Tokyo police in collaboration with mechanical engineers from Michigan Technological University, who devised the predator drone. Tokyo police hope to use the anti-drone drones to capture hostile drones that may be lurking in sensitive areas like the airspace around the Japanese prime minister’s office where an unmanned aircraft was intercepted in April of last year. You could start a business that offers a similar drone netting service to counter industrial espionage, terrorism and drug smuggling operations, and also to help enforce the new FAA drone regulations . 5. Become a Drone Hunter In the not-so-distant future, drones will be everywhere. People will find they need to call professional “drone control officers” to take down hostile drones hovering in their backyards, or capture the drones safely, just like they’d call animal control to take care of rogue animals. You could register a business that offers this service in your local area. A local “drone control agency” doesn’t seem so far-fetched, especially considering people are already bringing down drones themselves and being acquitted of any wrongdoing by courts of law. Images: Netherlands Police/YouTube, Droneshield This article, ” 5 Business Ideas You Can Start to Combat Hostile Drones ” was first published on Small Business Trends

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Many businesses have busy and slow seasons, with certain seasons attracting customers to their stores and websites. Whether it’s the holiday season or Independence Day, businesses must prepare well in advance for the sudden surge of customers if they’re to avoid a website crash. For brick-and-mortar businesses, this means hiring seasonal workers and making sure your point of sale system can handle the load. Online retailers invest that pre-rush time in checking to make sure their websites can handle a large number of customers at once. When customers have one day that is busier than all others, the challenge is even greater. With tens of thousands of visitors hitting a site at once, a Web host must be able to gracefully scale to meet the demand. As Sally McKenney of Sally’s Baking Addiction found out the day before Thanksgiving, without advance preparation, a site crash can happen in the middle of that busy day, leading to lost revenue and possible reputation damage. Below are a few things you can do to avoid a website crash and make sure your customers can get the online service they need on the busiest day of the year. How to Avoid a Website Crash Test Your Site At one time, website scalability was a mystery, with businesses only learning the hard way that their sites couldn’t handle a large amount of traffic at once. Today’s cloud-testing tools let businesses simulate multiple connections to their website at once. There are also free app-testing tools for businesses that sell products through an app. Run tests each year in advance of your busy day to make sure your website host is still providing the load handling you received in previous years. Use a Content Delivery Network For businesses with customers spread out over a large geographic area, a content delivery network (CDN) may be the best option. A CDN provider sets up servers in multiple locations and directs traffic to the closest server. This distributes the load in a way that keeps each server from being overloaded, even during the most extreme situations. If one server goes down, other servers can compensate for that, with customers experiencing a seamless transition. Keep Your Pages Light On a day when traffic is surging, even the slightest disruption can make a big difference. One way to cut down on site crashes is by simplifying your design. Each page element can slow down your page load times, so it’s important to quickly identify any items that might put strain on already-overtaxed servers. Google’s Make the Web Faster tool will examine your page and provide suggestions that will help you speed up the load time for each of your pages. Sometimes an item as simple as an image or a video ad could lead your page to be inaccessible to a large percentage of your customers on the busiest day of the year. For businesses that rely on their websites for sales, a site crash can be devastating. By taking measures to test and prepare your site, you’ll avoid the reputation damage and loss of income that can come from a crash during a crucial time. 404  Photo via Shutterstock This article, ” How to Avoid a Website Crash on Your Busiest Sales Day of the Year ” was first published on Small Business Trends

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Picking a business structure is usually the first big decision for any new business owner. My own companies have helped tens of thousands small businesses get started with an LLC or corporation — and as such, I’ve heard countless reasons why business owners think they should (or shouldn’t) incorporate. There are some common misconceptions associated with incorporation, often related to trying to avoid state taxes or any liability. To help new business owners better understand the benefits and limitations of corporations and LLCs, here’s an overview of some of the key facts, divided into three main areas: liability protection, taxes, and formality. Liability Protection: Putting Separation Between the Business Owner and the Business One of the main reasons for a small business to incorporate or form an LLC is to help protect the personal assets of the business owner(s) from anything that happens in the business. For example, if the business should be sued or can’t pay its debts, the “corporate shield” of a corporation or LLC helps protect the owner’s personal assets from the settlement or debts. Some business owners mistakenly think that they’re absolved of all personal responsibility once they incorporate or form an LLC; however, this isn’t the case. As an example, let’s say you’re the business owner of an LLC and you perform some kind of work for the business. Unfortunately, you’re negligent in the course of doing this work and your negligence causes damages and someone decides to sue. You might still be personally liable, because the damages were a result of your own personal actions. Here’s where it’s important to understand the difference between a tort and contractual lawsuit. An LLC or corporation can protect you from personal liability for contractual lawsuits (e.g. your business doesn’t hold up its end of a deal) but not against tort lawsuits (e.g. your personal actions cause the damages). This is why it’s smart to get a good insurance policy if you’ll be performing work yourself. The other key detail to know is that if your business employs contractors or employees, the corporate shield of a corporation or LLC will protect you from personal liability against things that your employees might do. This is why it can be critical to incorporate/form an LLC if anyone else works in your business. The bottom line? Incorporating or forming an LLC is a crucial step for protecting your personal assets. However, it’s not ‘bullet proof’ protection, particularly if you’re actively working in the business. You’re responsible for your own actions. Taxes: State Taxes, Self-employment Taxes, and More Small business owners usually have taxes on their mind when they consider incorporating. Some think they can incorporate in a low-tax or no-tax state to avoid paying state income taxes altogether. Others are looking to lower what they pay in self-employment taxes while working as a self-employed professional. Here are some of the key things to know when it comes to taxes and corporations/LLCs. First, for state income taxes, it doesn’t actually matter where the business is incorporated; it matters where you conduct business. So, if you live and run a business in California, you’ll need to pay state taxes on income earned in California- even if your business is incorporated in Nevada. Forming an LLC or corporation does give you some flexibility in how your business is taxed – and this might work in your favor. For example, if you elect S Corporation treatment for your corporation or LLC, you may be able to lower what you pay in self-employment taxes by dividing your income into salary and dividends (note: you should work with a tax advisor for this). In addition, corporations and LLCs often qualify for additional tax benefits and deductions that aren’t available to individuals and sole proprietors. Formality — Settling Potential Disagreements Among Owners Whenever a business has more than one owner, there’s always a chance that a disagreement will arise — no matter how close the owners may be. Without a formal agreement, there can be misunderstandings about how much of the business each founder owns or what to do should one owner want to leave the business. When you incorporate the company and issue stocks, you’ll prevent these kinds of misunderstandings and have a formal procedure for transferring ownership. Even if you don’t incorporate and choose to form an LLC instead (where you don’t issue stock), the LLC’s Operating Agreement can help formalize your business’ governance and ensure everyone is on the same page. The bottom line? Incorporating or forming an LLC lays the proper legal foundation and is an important step for any company. Just be sure you understand the details: it should never be considered an easy way to avoid taxes or taking responsibility for your own actions. LLC/Corp. Illustration via Shutterstock This article, ” The Right and Wrong Reasons to Incorporate or Form an LLC ” was first published on Small Business Trends

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Innovation gets defined so many ways that it can be confusing. While there is a repeatable framework for creating new value, the iterative nature of front end discovery work can perplex those who believe that work should be linear. Continue reading →

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In a press release announcing its request for the U.S. Supreme Court to review Seattle’s law minimum wage law, the International Franchise Association (IFA) — the industry trade association — claimed that raising the minimum wage hurts franchised businesses disproportionately. To bolster its argument, the IFA referenced a recent survey of owners of more than 600 owners of franchised and non-franchised businesses in eight industries in 24 metropolitan areas, conducted by the Employment Policies Institute. The survey, the IFA said, showed that “raising the minimum wage to $15 an hour will hurt franchise businesses disproportionately compared to non-franchise businesses.” I don’t think the survey makes that point. First, it’s not clear that the increase in the minimum wage “hurts” franchisees in Seattle. For businesses to be harmed by the law, they have to be unable to respond to the law in a way that protects their profits. But the survey itself shows that franchised businesses are more likely than independent businesses to be planning a strategic response to the law that protects their profits. The report says that “franchise businesses are more likely [than non-franchised businesses] … to take offsetting steps to manage the increased labor costs.” The survey shows that that three-quarters of franchisees surveyed would respond to the minimum wage increase by raising prices, as compared to 66 percent of independent businesses. Nearly two-thirds would reduce headcount and/or worker hours, as compared with only 51 and 46 percent of independent businesses, respectively. More than half (54 percent) of franchised businesses, but only 37 percent of non-franchised companies, would increase automation in response to a higher minimum wage. Because these strategies should help companies preserve their profits in response to the new law, franchisees are less likely than independent businesses to be “hurt” by the increase in the minimum wage. The report concludes that the “survey results suggest that there’s no rationale for treating franchise businesses differently than other small businesses in the final wage law.” But the survey results actually suggest the opposite. If franchisors have better knowledge of how to respond to a minimum wage increase to protect profits – by doing things like passing on the cost increase to customers in the form of higher prices or by automating operations — then it does make sense to treat the franchised businesses differently. They are better able to cope with the change than independent businesses. Second, the survey doesn’t actually show that being a franchise causes a business to suffer more from an increase in the minimum wage. The study didn’t control for differences in the size, the industry distribution, or the fraction of their labor force earning minimum wage that is present across franchised and independent businesses. These factors could be the cause of the differences between franchised and non-franchised businesses. The survey reveals that non-franchised business had fewer employees than the franchised ones; were more likely to be found in retail shopping, beauty and health and fitness, and less likely to be found in child care, lodging and retail food; and are younger. Perhaps the minimum wage increase disproportionately affects larger and younger companies, and those in childcare, lodging and retail food. Furthermore, the survey results might simply be an artifact of which companies have more people working at minimum wage. As any introduction to microeconomics student will tell you, companies with more people paid the minimum wage should be more likely to respond to a minimum wage increase than companies that have fewer employees being paid at that level. The survey is consistent with that simple observation. Without controlling for differences in the prevailing wages, number of employees, or industry distribution across franchised and independent companies, we can’t know whether franchised businesses are more adversely affected by the minimum wage. The IFA is a trade association, not a research organization, and it wants the courts to overturn the Seattle minimum wage law. So I don’t fault them for advocating a position. But the “study” conducted by the Economic Policies Institute doesn’t make the case that franchised businesses are disproportionately harmed by minimum wage laws. Seattle Monorail Photo via Shutterstock This article, ” Does Seattle’s Minimum Wage Law Disproportionately Harm Franchisees? ” was first published on Small Business Trends

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Who’s been looking at your LinkedIn Profile? What LinkedIn Profiles have you been looking at? There are three options for LinkedIn profile privacy. LinkedIn Privacy Settings allow you to determine how much information you share when you are viewing someone else’s LinkedIn Profile. I’ll explore all three of them here and show you how easy it is to make a change. One key point is that these settings can be adjusted at any time you like. (The video below is a quick 2 minute video that also walks you through the process.) LinkedIn Privacy Settings Options Why Three Options? So, you can view a profile with the default recommended settings for your day to day use of LinkedIn. However, if you are doing research … whether it’s part of a job search or part of your industry research efforts, you can change the way your profile appears to the people on the other side. One of the options is complete private mode. While this might seem a little sneaky there are reasons for this that I will go into below. Three Options for LinkedIn Profile Viewing The default setting – which shows up as the “Recommended” option includes your name, company, industry, location and your profile picture. Semi-Private shows a generic title, industry and general location. Complete Private Mode – Is exactly what it says. Nothing is shown to the user whose LinkedIn profile you visited. Why Hide? I give the LinkedIn team credit for creating this LinkedIn Privacy Settings option. There are times where you might be looking for things on LinkedIn that you don’t want the other person to know you are looking. The obvious situation is a job search. However, there are other scenarios where a Private Mode viewing option is also helpful. For example, when you are doing research on the industry — whether it’s your current industry, a competitor, or a possible business partner. You might want to see what they post and how they position themselves. Researching Job Candidates — If you are researching a job candidate you might not want to show that the five people in your firm are checking out their profile. Why would anyone ever want to hide? There are valid reasons. The good news is LinkedIn makes it really easy to adjust these settings as often as your like. Changing your LinkedIn Profile View settings is simple: Login to LinkedIn Go to top right corner – Hover over your profile picture. This is the “Account & Settings” and look down the list to click on “Privacy & Settings” Click on “Manage” A new page will pop up. Note: It may request that you login again. This is for your privacy. In the middle of the page there is an option labeled as: “Select what others see when you’ve viewed their profile” Click on this option Another Dialog Box Pops Up. The “What Others See when you’ve viewed their profile” dialog box. There are three options — Recommended, Semi-Private and Private Select the privacy option you would like to use Click “Save Changes” and you are good to go. The selected setting will stay in place until you change it. Change this setting as needed. Is this a valuable LinkedIn feature? I’m curious to know if most people know about, use or like this option. This is a very informal survey. I’d like you to add a quick comment with your thoughts. I’d also like to hear from the experts at using this option. I’m guessing HR professionals and industry researchers have some great use cases. Or perhaps they just always leave their settings as Complete Private Mode as their permanent setting. Did you know about this option? Do you use this option? How do you use this option? I always am looking for better ways to use LinkedIn. Even though I’ve been using LinkedIn for over 10 years there are new features … which means new tips and tricks popping up all the time. Republished by permission. Original here . LinkedIn Photo via Shutterstock This article, ” Who’s Viewing You on LinkedIn? Take Control with Privacy Settings ” was first published on Small Business Trends

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On Tuesday, January 12, 2016, President Barack Obama gave his final State of the Union (“SOTU”) address to a joint session of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.. According to Nielsen TV Ratings estimates, an average audience of 31.3 million people watched the SOTU across 12 television networks; and according to Nielsen Twitter TV Ratings, about 9.8 million people in the U.S. saw one or more of the 2.6 million tweets about the 2016 SOTU. Continue reading →

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